C. diff

Seres Therapeutics announced last week an agreement with Nestlé Health Science to jointly commercialize SER-109—the Massachusetts-based company’s investigational oral microbiome treatment for recurrent C. difficile infection—in the United States and Canada.

Under the deal, Seres will receive $175 million upfront in license payments, an additional $125 million upon U.S. FDA approval of the treatment, and up to $225 million in milestones. If approved, SER-109 would become the first U.S…

Boston University-led nonprofit CARB-X announced Tuesday that it will give Arizona-based Accelerate Diagnostics $578,000 (plus up to $2.1 million in milestones) to develop a rapid optical imaging diagnostic for sepsis and serious antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

In other antimicrobial resistance news, Boston’s Selux Diagnostics announced Tuesday an additional $14.6 million award from the U.S. Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) to develop a rapid…

The Access to Medicine (AtM) Foundation last week published a pediatric analysis of additional results from its 2021 AtM Index, finding just 7% of pharmaceutical companies’ R&D is for children under 12, despite significant gaps in treatment options for children.

The report praised GSK, Johnson & Johnson and Sanofi for being “the most active” in developing pediatric versions of products, and also named examples of drugs that “could each make a big difference” for LMICs: Eli…

The U.S. Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) announced two awards Wednesday for “advanced development” of investigational drugs targeting antibiotic-resistant infections.

Massachusetts-based Vedanta Biosciences scored up to $76.9 million ($7.4 million upfront) to complete an ongoing Phase 2 trial and continue clinical development of VE303—a novel, human microbiome-derived treatment for high-risk C. difficile infection. The drug becomes the second CARB-X-…

biologics developer Lumen Bioscience announced yesterday that it has raised $16 million in Series B financing to develop its traveler’s diarrhea, norovirus and C. difficile therapies.

The Gates Foundation backed the clinical-stage biotech with funding in 2018 to develop low-cost therapeutics for intestinal pathogens in infants.

CARB-X announced yesterday that it is awarding German biotech Evotec up to $2.9 million (with a potential $5.5 million more in milestone payments) to develop a new class of broad-spectrum antibiotics to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

In other antibiotics news this week, Massachusetts-based Seres Therapeutics announced positive topline results from a Phase 3 trial of its oral microbe-based treatment for recurrent C. difficile…

CARB-X announced this week that it is giving Facile Therapeutics up to $1.26 million to develop the antitoxin Ebselen as an oral therapeutic to treat recurrent C. difficile infections.

CARB-X could give the California-based biotech $17 million in additional funding if it reaches project milestones, the press release said.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced last week that it has used a deep machine learning algorithm to identify a new compound that kills a broad range of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

According to an article published in Cell, the drug, halicin, defeated a wide range of pathogens, including M. tuberculosis and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and effectively treated C. difficile and pan-resistant A. baumannii infections in mice.

The researchers said they plan…

Pfizer last week named Kentucky’s University of Louisville as its vaccine division’s first “Center of Excellence,” committing up to $11 million to fund “real-world epidemiologic research” into the burden of vaccine-preventable diseases, according to the company’s press release. The funds will initially support population-based surveillance of S. pneumoniae, C. difficile and RSV, the university said in a separate statement.

Pfizer said it plans to announce a second global center in the…

Merck announced this week that the U.S. FDA has approved Dificid (fidaxomicin)—its macrolide antibiotic oral suspension and tablet for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in children 6 months and older. The agency granted priority review for the drugs in October 2019.

In other antibiotic news, Oxford-based Summit Therapeutics announced last week that the U.S. Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority has awarded it an additional $8.8 million to test its C.…